How much Americans got in their stimulus checks in every state

  • The US government sent stimulus checks to nearly 162 million households in 2020. 
  • The chart below shows exactly where these payments went and how much they were worth.
  • These figures represent the first round of stimulus checks. The second round is currently being distributed.
  • Visit Personal Finance Insider's homepage for more stories.

Nearly 162 million US households received a stimulus check in 2020.

The direct cash payments were approved as part of the CARES Act to help offset the financial havoc caused by the coronavirus pandemic. In December, Congress authorized a second round of payments. Most were delivered in the first several weeks of January by direct deposit, but some paper checks and debit cards are still on the way.

The initial round of payments were worth up to $1,200 for eligible individuals and $2,400 for married couples, plus an additional $500 for dependents under age 17. The second round of payments were worth up to $600 for eligible individuals and $1,200 for couples, plus $600 for dependents under age 17.

The IRS recently published data on how many first-round payments were sent to each state and how much they totaled. We used that data to calculate the average payment households received.

How much the government sent in stimulus checks in each state

State  Number of payments Total amount* Average payment*
Alabama

2,520,501

$4,243,599,000

$1,684
Alaska

354,697

$609,827,000

$1,719
Arizona

3,484,125

$5,918,266,000

$1,699
Arkansas

1,540,606

$2,650,191,000

$1,720
California

18,108,968

$29,600,287,000

$1,635
Colorado

2,744,340

$4,601,299,000

$1,677
Connecticut

1,691,299

$2,732,359,000

$1,616
Delaware

494,516

$821,513,000

$1,661
Florida

11,304,707

$18,514,948,000

$1,638
Georgia

5,123,112

$8,580,506,000

$1,675
Hawaii

730,144

$1,232,420,000

$1,688
Idaho

860,042

$1,590,789,000

$1,850
Illinois

6,025,347

$10,027,547,000

$1,664
Indiana

3,328,962

$5,822,314,000

$1,749
Iowa

1,541,039

$2,747,102,000

$1,783
Kansas

1,370,494

$2,442,706,000

$1,782
Kentucky

2,354,487

$4,032,821,000

$1,713
Louisiana

2,357,143

$3,910,130,000

$1,659
Maine

755,920

$1,271,740,000

$1,682
Maryland

2,859,828

$4,612,506,000

$1,613
Massachusetts

3,298,914

$5,249,775,000

$1,591
Michigan

5,061,845

$8,627,576,000

$1,704
Minnesota

2,716,524

$4,721,051,000

$1,738
Mississippi

1,542,953

$2,575,625,000

$1,669
Missouri

3,103,417

$5,351,832,000

$1,724
Montana

559,778

$978,117,000

$1,747
Nebraska

922,479

$1,659,444,000

$1,799
Nevada

1,596,919

$2,624,466,000

$1,643
New Hampshire

707,748

$1,184,262,000

$1,673
New Jersey

4,169,435

$6,807,058,000

$1,633
New Mexico

1,071,985

$1,787,812,000

$1,668
New York

9,848,010

$15,723,095,000

$1,597
North Carolina

5,152,360

$8,722,225,000

$1,693
North Dakota

367,792

$650,236,000

$1,768
Ohio

6,136,466

$10,248,235,000

$1,670
Oklahoma

1,937,277

$3,381,517,000

$1,745
Oregon

2,158,237

$3,601,722,000

$1,669
Pennsylvania

6,561,454

$10,994,157,000

$1,676
Rhode Island

565,824

$909,146,000

$1,607
South Carolina

2,623,258

$4,423,344,000

$1,686
South Dakota

441,106

$795,022,000

$1,802
Tennessee

3,524,349

$5,992,076,000

$1,700
Texas

13,256,460

$22,853,507,000

$1,724
Utah

1,356,301

$2,596,943,000

$1,915
Vermont

343,498

$577,317,000

$1,681
Virginia

4,011,528

$6,743,958,000

$1,681
Washington 3,652,184 $6,148,723,000 $1,684
Washington, DC

328,256

$448,637,000

$1,367
West Virginia

976,622

$1,663,183,000

$1,703
Wisconsin

2,939,210

$5,112,753,000

$1,739
Wyoming

282,145

$504,873,000

$1,789
US territories, citizens abroad, armed forces stationed overseas

1,179,277

$1,801,000,000

$1,527

*Totals are rounded

How Americans are using their stimulus checks

Most people stashed the money from the first round of checks in savings or used it to pay off debt, according to data from the Federal Reserve Bank of New York. Less than one-third of US households used the cash for essential and non-essential purchases. 

"The first impact payment this past April touched off a savings windfall," said Anand Talwar, deposits and consumer strategy executive for Ally Bank. "The banking industry saw consumer spending dip and deposit growth skyrocket more than five times its normal rate in the second quarter and remain elevated well into the fall," Talwar added.

The eligibility requirements for receiving a second stimulus check were slightly different than the first. While fewer households qualified based on adjusted gross income (AGI), mixed-status families — couples with one citizen spouse and one non-citizen spouse — became eligible for first- and second-round payments under the December legislation.

Talwar said that, so far, the spike in savings activity after the initial distribution of payments doesn't seem to be repeating itself this time around.

"It's still early, but it seems some people may actually be using their small stimulus windfall as the government intends, to stimulate spending and investment," he said.

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